History

West Virginia was the first southern state to end slavery

  by Frederick H. Lowe NorthStar News Today.com readers Sharon Gale and General Parker were the only ones to  participate in last week’s contest about the first southern state to abolish slavery. Gale said is was South Carolina. Later Gale wrote she had to do more research. Sharon, thanks for participating, but your answer was incorrect. South Carolina was the[Read More…]

Hundreds Celebrate as Nation’s African American Museum Nears Completion

  by Savannah Harris Special to the Trice Edney News Wire from Howard University News Service WASHINGTON, D.C. — Hundreds of people gathered at an inaugural event for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture Monday night to celebrate the completion of the museum’s exterior in a year that marks three significant moments in American history. This[Read More…]

BOOKS

  John Head Author John Head hit the nail on the head with his 2004 book, Black Men and Depression: Saving Our Lives, Healing Our Families and Friends. Head, a 1999-2000 Fellow in the Rosalynn Carter Mental Health Journalism Program in Atlanta, writes about mental illness and depression, subjects that at the time were little discussed among African-American men. The[Read More…]

BLACK HISTORY

  Delaware governor pardons black abolitionist African Americans who sought to escape slavery were called mentally ill by Frederick H. Lowe Delaware Gov. Jack Markell on Monday pardoned black abolitionist Samuel D. Burris, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, 168 years to the day he was convicted and sentenced to prison and to servitude for helping black men and women[Read More…]

Minority Women Get Worse Breast Cancer Care, Regardless of Tumor Type: Study

  Black or Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed later, go without recommended treatments By Mary Elizabeth Dallas HealthDay News — No matter the type or stage of breast cancer, minority women are more likely to be diagnosed later in the disease than white women, and they are also less likely to receive recommended treatments, a new study[Read More…]

Lieutenant General Frank E. Petersen, Jr.

  Lieutenant General Frank E. Petersen, Jr., the first African-American Marine Corps general and the first black Marine pilot, was honored by the Congressional Black Caucus, following his death in late August. “While we mourn the loss of the United States Marine Corps Lieutenant General Frank E. Petersen, Jr., we also celebrate his over three decades of honorable, inspired and[Read More…]

Emmett Till archives being created at Florida State University

  by Zenitha Prince Special to the Trice Edney News Wire from the Afro American Newspaper (TriceEdneyWire.com) —  It was a death that shocked the world and ignited a movement, and Florida State University is building what it hopes to be the premiere repository of historical material surrounding the life and death of Emmett Till. The 14-year-old Chicago teenager was[Read More…]

Notorious ‘blood diamond’ trafficker nabbed en route to U. S.

  (TriceEdneyWire.com) — U.S. businessman Michel Desaedeleer, whose dealings in ‘blood diamonds’ which were shown in the 2006 movie of the same name, starring Djimond Hounsou and Leonardo DiCaprio, was pulled him off a plane and arrested by police in Malaga, Spain, for alleged war crimes and enslavement in the African country of Sierra Leone. Desaedeleer, 64, was flying to[Read More…]

Where Cotton was King, Racism is still King

  By Susan Hagen University of Rochester White Southerners who live today in former slavery strongholds, a region known as the Cotton Belt, are more likely to express negative attitudes toward blacks than their fellow Southerners. The findings are based on county-by-county analysis of census data and opinion polls of more than 39,000 southern whites. Residents of these areas where[Read More…]

Will the Force Be With Wilberforce

  Historically black college faces tough financial challenges following the Great Recession. School hires a turnaround specialist as president By Frederick H. Lowe Wilberforce University, a Historically Black University owned by the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church, will know in November if it will remain an accredited institution, nearly 150 years after it was founded to educate the black children[Read More…]

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